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, send it to us, we had it on the air and a couple of minutes. because of technology, because of things changing so rapidly. it is a brand new world. vicki, thank you for the importance of that network and everything else. thank you. next, i want to introduce you to a gentleman. he is tall, dark, handsome. sorry, that was me. wrong script. [laughter] you, too, right? it's your birthday, right? ok. in all seriousness, a gentleman by the name of dmitri is here. i want you to meet him. his name is dmitri belzer. he has worked in the disability community for years providing technology access for more than 30 years. trained as a sign language expert and interpreter, he established a death services program ast san francisco state university, provided support services for colleges. we don't call them disabled. they happen to have a disability. he joined pacific bell, helped organize honda the advisory group for people that happen to have a disability. he gave them put to that company on how to develop features that will help them do better. he became the director of death and disabled services
, this is part of our broadband technology grant, the average cost is zero. [laughter] if you were to buy this for your home, it costs a couple of hundred dollars. the games cost between $20.40 dollars. they have hundreds of different games to play. to the games cost between $20.40 dollars. and hundreds of different games to play. we have other adaptive devices that can be used with the wii. this is a foot pedal. -- this is a foot pedal. along with the buttons on the hand device connected to alicia's remote, we can use foot pedals if there are games the require numerous controls. it is very adaptive. then, really interesting. what about someone who may be a quadriplegic and does not have the ability to use arms or legs? there is a sip and tug adapter that allows someone to control the wii with his or her mouth. you can still engaged the wii by puffing into the tube. this company has made the wii completely accessible for anyone to play. it is a great option. if you want more information about the adaptive equipment for the wii, visit alicia's booth. >> i work for the independent living ce
that because if it hits to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up
for joining us and being part of this wonderful effort that we are announcing today with our technology community and certainly with the families of sandy hook. i would like to thank the families who flew all the way here from newtown, connecticut for joining us here today in san francisco. and while you are far away from home, i hope that you feel welcomed in our city. as a father of two girls myself, i can't imagine the pain and grief that you have suffered these past three months. and i have profound respect for your courage and for your commitment, for turning this grief into action. the tragic and horrifying events in sandy hook elementary school, touched every american, a tragedy of this magnitude brings along with it the pain, the shock, and the disbelief. and it forces all of us to ask the question how can we prevent such terrible events? how do we protect our children? our youth, our residents? for san francisco, it is very important for us to continue to have an open dialogue regarding gun violence so that we can answer these questions ourselves. today, we honored the three-mo
and supporting major advances in technology and recent history for them to turn their attention to solutions to gun violence, mental health, school safety and community. it gives me hope, at a time when hope is most needed. in my family is deeply grateful for this hope and to be part of this positive change that will benefit all of us in the future, thank you. >> ben and jeremy richmond. >> thank you, for having us today. thank you to the tech industry for coming to our aid. my name is jennifer hensel and this is my husband jeremy richmond, three months ago on december 14th, we lost our only child, daughter of 6 years aviel rose richmond. at the sandy hook elementary school shooting. on that day, mentally unstable gunman changed our lives and the lives of more than 25 other families in one of the worst ways imaginable. we are devastated. in the wake of our grief, and desperate to understand why someone would kill innocent children why someone would kill my child, we started the aveil foundation. jeremy and i are going to play to our strengths and answer the why. we are scientists and we see
that it is an inspiration to all of us. i am the chairman of the sandy hook promise technology committee to reduce gun violence. we are a committee composed of technology experts. spanning hardware and often wear and interprize applications and internet technology and gun safety technologies. we came together right after the tragic shootings in newtown to support the needs of the sandy hook promise and i am proud to announce today, the sandy hook innovation challenge. this is a program that will offer an incentive prize to the most promising new ideas. the mechanics of the mies are still being worked out. but here today, i want to issue a call nationwide, call, to the most innovative new ideas. and ask people to who ves ideas to log on to the sandy hook promise website and that is sandy hook promise, all one word,.org. it is intended to dove tail with the government and also to expand the scope of that beyond the areas that the government's efforts will cover. this will result in the most rapid and thorough exploration of new innovations that will help us reduce gun violence and reduce gun violence ag
just that. in fact, when we signaled from our technology company that is they were telling us that our payroll tax was a job-killing effort here that we had to change it. what we went ahead and fixed and it and got it done and after the dishandling of the redevelopment towards find a lasting solution to fund affordable house and is did that with the creation of affordable housing fund 30 million-dollar a year for the next 30 years to build affordable housings and to insentive eyes builders to get more housing on their sites and and invite police and firefighters into an emergency responders commute in san francisco to hmm with the down payments of the first too time home buyers efforts we were asked to vest? our neighborhood park and is streets and we did just that with our million dollar general obligation bond to build and construct more open space most importantly, we put san franciscans back to work and we have a growing economy and we have invested in our city. so the year of 20 if we will, was about getting everything done. and when we did that, we were complimented by an un
absorb the culture and create. and you can look for us to be a technology hub going forward and we have never been followers. and have always been leaders. it's a very unique place and a great place to live. i relax by driving through and gatherings and reliving great memorize of being a kid in oakland and then i may end up just parking around little grand lake theatre and drive down and take a look at the paramount and so if there is a play that is happening and so the first thing that i tell people is go to jack land square and you will be surprised that we have a square and so shore line and it is the it could be the giving of great say food and go see things that inspire me about oakland is again it's ability to change. for every think that you would every say negative about oakland, i can say ten positives we are our own city. oakland to know it, is to love it.. >> (applause) all right. so thank you mayor khan and now we have for san francisco coming up and to sso to welcome mayor lee welcome kristine row wish senator vice senior vice president of service area of case zero per
technology is a one-stop shop. >>> the other thing that becomes very special is [inaudible] there is nowhere else go from here. . (applause) let me conclude with a little bit of sports and that is to say that, we are just about in spring training, world champions san francisco. also we are putting a bid together for super bowl 50, or 51 whichever one they will take, i'm be happy with that, yes, you know, we have got world baseball series coming in in march, in the at&t park, we have america's cup 55 days of sailing coming in the summer charles schwab cup in october and now, we are getting ready potentially to have more international sporting ebbs that really come to compliment what we do not just in san francisco but for the whole bay area and i want to suggest to you that we have an opportunity to do that through the one s f program that we created to sustain all of the theater we are doing to make sure we do it right with your help. and i'll say to you're to you and i think i have said this in some other circles, knowing when we were at the five-yard line, ethree min
ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city go
they want to be with the talented and with oakland being the liberator and home of the -- technology in general and thriving arts and cutting edge innovation in general in areas we really have the talent here in the bay area and i think that is critical and also, i think we are looking at investors internationally and frankly at an -- promising a lot of our time to chinese investors and really an international economy but we are looking at not just across the country but to invest and -- in the bay area and it's not goal of -- 50% there and to ed we are a region and many of these companys are going to be make this horizontal and vertical -- chinese investors in the entire bay area and so they have to have it's a different game. and you know, texans have to live there. the reality is that this is one of the most beautiful places with the best whrr and -- [inaudible] company that is going to for tech assistance on your software and you get somebody in india well they are actually -- because oakland they are putting a call center in oakland to get a quicker turn around and -- in many
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
they are technology and helping us achieve what we have done i guess we are here and ready to punch the button on the computer. we are using a laptop tonight and it's going to go on at 9:00. i'm just incredibly grateful and keep pinching myself that this is happening. i'm incredibly overwhelmed that this is happening and i'm eager to share this work with all of you. thank you. across america, cities and towns, homes and businesses all depend upon one basic resource. modern civilization and life itself would be impossible without it. woman: okay, so today, we're going to look at how do we get our water? narrator: and today, it's a matter of simply turning on the tap. so often, we forget about the value of water. water is a commodity that is essential to life. 100 years ago, it would have been hard to imagine turning on the tap water. and now, it's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does
agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road th
. >> and at that point the data would be available for developers; the technology, already exists. it could be an existing app maker who plugs in and goes from 700 cabs to 1700 cabs; it could be a new player. that part we would not control the timeline but given what we have seen in terms of the demand for this kind of way to access transportation, and we're fairly confident that that would happen fairly quickly. >> mine is quick. director heinicke covered most of the things i want to talk about. thank you for the research; you have made a lot of progress. congratulations to you and your staff. >> thank you. >> i want to go back to mr. -- made the point when he invested a lot of money in apps, i think director reiskin said, even if they invested in apps, they can be used in open architecture. have you taken into consideration what is out there? >> it is appropriate to allow companies that have a pride in their brand, to develop their own apps; if they want to offer and app with only their taxis, we should allow that exist. we don't want to interfere with that brand. we want people to be abl
, working with existing technology providers. >> thank you. >> (calling names) >> good afternoon. >> also it's not going to be relevant to the subject, i thought we would be discussing the issue of having electronic weigh bills which is finished and done with, i want to express my opposition; we don't need anybody to bake through our information; it is not fair to have our financial data access by third parties or more. and we really think that by doing that process, it's nothing but adding another stress to what you have already seen here, with poor men working for their families; it's going to be another burden for them. i am sorry but // thank you very much. >> mark gruber, -- >> thank you. mark gruber. united taxicab workers. we desperately need electronic taxicab access. it should be done in the form of a single app put out my contract through an rfp instead of having some multitude of apps fighting among each other. you might have gotten a glimmer from the taxi magic representative. this is something that needs to be done right. and the only way i can see doing it right is to have
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
and disability technology summit. it was approximately a month ago that secretary kathleen sebelius said the u.s. department of health and human services announced the creation of this new federal agency, and that is the administration for community living. and in her words, she said "for too long, too many americans have faced the a possible choice between moving to an institution or living at home without the long-term services and support they need." so this new administration for community living will be to helping people with disabilities, as well as seniors, to live a productive, satisfying lives. now, as you may be aware, the aging and disability population has been recognized actually at the local and state levels for quite some time now. so the mechanisms for providing support that facility community living have been really brought together into local and state agencies such as the san francisco departments the of aging and adult services that serves those populations since the year 2000. yet, at the federal level, policy developments from a community outreach, and program implementat
solutions prevail. and so, when we strip away points of view, and focus in on what technologies will actually work. we shift the equation from rhetoric to pragmatics. which products can get get to be field tested? which smart gun technologies will pass the government lab testing? and right now, if you wanted to buy a smart gun, you would have a very difficult time doing it. but what we can do in technology is advance the state, such that you have that option. and so, we are really careful to make sure that we focus in on innovation and use a tried and true, trusted process in the silicon valley and let the best ideas be the ones that are the ones that are commercially viable. >> give us some ideas, (inaudible). >> sure. the field of smart gun technology is an interesting field. it spans academic research, commercial research, a lot of the federal funding for smart gun technology in the u.s. stopped in the late 90s. and so, part of the excitement that we have here today is the ability to reignite, the innovation and creativity around some of those promising technologies. some of
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
enough. the reason we are here is technology. the technology is all about providing input, a life that we can live that doesn't require living life without the troublesome requirement of having much of a brain. these are wonderful things. the american citizen watches this in the upper left for about seven hours a day. that is information without action. i loved it. but in moderation. on the lower left. we see a topographic map from a satellite. what you see in red is the city of baltimore. places where the sunlight does not hit the ground because it is all paved. it is to make sure that every footfall is secure and you cannot pay a bit of attention to it. many of you have been doing it for quite a few years now. it is not good to sleepwalk through life. that way we don't have to worry about a thing. there is no bond on the floor. it is designed to be controlled and removed our brains of for having to worry about the details. i use google for an hour or two or three every day and my work and in my life. what a wonderful tool. it reduces exercise in thought through the momentary process of
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
'm going to go down the line. as we get to our military partners i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears,
. now each time we have a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and then came back together. mer and more cities are realizing gravanis is a pattern crime and as dr. spicer pointed out, it's a great way crime to many other activities. so you can wind up precluding with a lot of other stuff by dealing with them when they are down to the part doing gravanis damage before th
. the technology network in san jose who made this a crucial project. i want to call out a thanks to or tactical team. we know how to make it small, not over 150 feet in the air. we have a studio, zone engineering and i have to say thanks to hmr who has been a rock star and directly one of the reasons this is happening. an extremely talented project. thank you all. i also want to just take a moment to really acknowledge that while leo and i have done a lot of things m in this world, we would not be able to do it alone. there is only one person responsible for this project and that is executive director of the arts. luminarias. i can go on and on. i think i will throughout the night. do know that she's a special person and this entire community owes her a debt of gratitude. i want to thank leo and his family for bringing the level of artistic integrity for this work that somehow slipped through the progress of a work of contemporary art parallel in art history. it has everything to do with leo and our interpretations with our discussion and that one minute that transformed how people will be rec
that is totally illegal this radio cab driver i think everybody would agree with me -- the technology fee we already have smart phones so we don't need anymore technology i think that's it thank you very much. good afternoon you are very intelligent people sitting in the panel i bought my medallion 3 years ago and after 3 years i bought my house which is almost 350 thousand dollars. i've been driving a taxi for the last 23 years and the rule was the people on the list they would get the permit now after the mta changed the rule but i was leasing before from the yellow and i think that i have not been rewarded i have been punished after 23 years serving the people of san francisco and that is not fair and now i heard that they are going to issue the permits for 250 thousand dollars. they have issued permits for free they have 8000 for free and why i have to pay 250 thousand dollars if you have to issue the permits for 150 thousand dollars then i am requesting also to reduce my price also thank you very much. applause. >> somebody else? >> good afternoon. >> good afternoon. i start drivin
. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spe
healthcare and certainly a leader in technology and healthcare as well and case veer certainly helps our entire community thrive and then one s f which, is out of the organizing committee and one s f and i hope you take time to get very familiar with what this organization is doing for san francisco and how you can utilize this organization to become a part of the american's cup experience. one s f is mobilizing san francisco's corporation and is citizens behind the many many community and legacy benefits of the america's cup and there are many. cruise ship terminal infrastructure projects and so when you become a one s f partner you will drive that local effort and help provide the funding support and there are so many exciting ways you can become aligned with the cup this exciting year and so one s f of the america's cup organizing committee and really the mayor will say more about that and robert half international i have to thank them for helping me find my great business manager this year just on the side and i wanted to thank randal my second who's regent vice president of mice
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)